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How To Become A Commercial Model

Commercial modelling is often overlooked by aspiring models yet the reality is that it is much easier to get into than fashion modelling and often more lucrative. While it may not be as ‘glamorous’ as fashion modelling,  commercial modelling is a diverse industry with plenty of room for growth. Read on for our beginner’s tips on how to become a commercial model.

Commercial Versatility

The restrictions tied to the world of fashion modeling are lifted within commercial modeling. There are avenues for men and women of all shapes and sizes to find their footing within the industry.

Commercial models are required for a selection of jobs, including of catalogues, campaigns, trade shows and television gigs.

Flipping through a non-fashion magazine is the perfect example of your options as a commercial model.

Beautiful and “real” looking people portraying and selling fundamental clothing, items and lifestyles. You can be any height, shape and age to become a commercial model.

Representation

As like any other form of modelling, it is best to do your research in the world of agencies and find representation.

This takes the stress out of finding work and allows a professional booker in the field to find clients for you.

Start by contacting agencies to arrange a ‘walk-in’ meeting.

Alternatively, you can send them an email with the best shots from your portfolio.

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Composite Card

Composite cards, or more commonly referred to, as “comp-cards” are essentially a models business card. Producers, directors and agents don’t always have time to interview and audition every model interested in the job.

Comp-cards provide a quick and easy way for the aforementioned to see exactly what you’re made of. The simple A5 card can be sent internationally to help you garner exposure without mailing your bulky portfolio across the globe.

A comp-card should be made up of five photos and an about me section. The photographs should include a clear head shot followed by smaller versatile images showcasing your work. On the back, your basic statistics, measurements and contact details for the agencies benefit.

Personality & Acting

Commercial modelling is about selling a product, so think about what it is your selling and how the best way to approach this would be during job castings.

Acting classes aren’t only for the aspiring thespian; they provide crucial performance skills for models and actors alike.

“Modeling is really silent acting,” commendable advice from British American model Arizona Muse. While training isn’t a requirement when getting jobs, it is beyond beneficial for your abilities and confidence.

Knowing how to audition correctly and how to navigate a set is priceless skill for commercial models. It will make you appear professional and feel prepared for your first gig.

Payment

The income that a commercial model can earn is job dependent and varies from the job’s attributes such as how the client intends to use the images, the market in which they are based and the model’s level of industry experience. Usage can also affect the pay of a job, meaning whether the ad is to appear locally, nationally or internationally.

Generating a full-time income through commercial modelling can still be patchy regardless. During the commencement of your career you might find yourself working gratis. The industry works on speculation, hence the term “spec work”.

Marketing teams often cast commercial models to test shoots prior to the contract being configured and accepted by the client. The hope, with “spec work” is to earn a paid contract plus an ongoing partnership. It is a risky manoeuvre to pull off, but it’s the best way to acquire experience while simultaneously striving for a big break.

Need more information? Check out our ‘How To Become A Model in Australia‘ article for all the answers.

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3 Comments

Sharon Bootsman

Hi The Photostudio,

I really would like to become a model!
My measurements are:
172m, 95cm hips, 60cm waist, 79cm chest.
Hope to hear from you soon!

Kind regards,
Sharon Bootsman

Reply
Michael-josh

I’m an aspiring model looking to do commercial modelling hope I receive positive feedback.
kind regards
Josh

Reply

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